Sections
In This Section
Peggy Quotes

Peggy Seeger: She must be one of the most complete artists around today. Peggy Seeger's tongue-in-cheek look at life comes accompanied by music from all sorts of sources. Alongside the piano, the guitar, the Appalachian dulcimer, the concertina and the banjo, she set the lot aside for a moment or two last night and just simply created rhythm and music by taping the side of her guitar. For her it spelt out a sort of rhythm of life. - Neil Johnston, Belfast Telegraph

Peggy Quotes 2

Her singing is as highly charged as ever and her writing as pointed and witty.
- Dave Laing

 

Almost Commercially Viable Reviews

"There is a lovely story of how the intriguing name for this duo (No Spring Chickens) and the album (Almost Commercially Viable) came about, told on the CD cover. You can also read the words to the songs, which is handy (although they can all be heard clearly). Most of the songs have been written by Peggy in the 80s and 90s, the rest being by her partner of many years, Ewan MacColl, who died in 1989, and others. Peggy shows herself to be a very accomplished song writer, at home in many styles - contemporary folk, jazz, jokey and serious. She has the fun of Tom Paxton combined with the social awareness of Roy Bailey and has produced a very varied CD.

"Both Peggy and Irene's voices are really fresh, despite their combined ages of over a century. Peggy sounds clear and sharp in the hard-hitting song 'Guilty' and seductive in the jazzy 'Sweet Heroine'. Irene has a soft voice, high and light, which complements Peggy's voice well. She sings some songs solo and some with Peggy.

"I would like to especially praise the accompaniments which are carefully chosen to go with the mood of the songs, and often understated. They are expertly written and performed. The balance of sound on the recording is perfect. Such quality in many areas combines to make a CD that, with an open mind and a catholic taste in music, you are bound to enjoy - as I did."

Andy Malkin, Stirrings, No. 97, September-November 1998

Personal tools